Inuit Legend Barbie Doll

$415.00

Inuit Legend Barbie Doll
Gold Label
Designer: Christy Marcus (Autographed)
Release Date: 6/1/2005

CONDITION
Doll is in mint condition, never removed from box.
Box is also in excellent condition.
Clean, smoke-free environment.

Please note, all prices are in US dollars.
FREE Shipping applies to this doll.

1 in stock

Description

Inuit Legend Barbie Doll
Gold Label
Release Date: 6/1/2005

Fashion student Christy Marcus created the Inuit Legend Barbie doll. This gorgeous doll was the winner of the Ryerson University (Toronto, Canada) Barbie Fashion Design contest. The ensemble begins with a bodice of white sueded brushed tricot decorated with plush trim and ribbon and cord accents. The skirt of beautifully printed sueded tricot also features plush trim. A brown satin underskirt complements the outfit. Accessories include boots, gloves, and a cord and feather choker.

The designer, Christy Marcus, has autographed / signed the box.

CONDITION
Doll is in mint condition, never removed from box.
Box is also in excellent condition, please review photos.

Clean, smoke-free environment.

  • Brand: Mattel
  • Country of Manufacture: Indonesia
  • Doll Size: 11.5in.
  • Labels and Editions: Gold Label
  • MPN: G8892
  • Recommended Age: 14+
  • Special Features: Autographed/Signed by the designer
  • UPC: 027084190786
  • Year: 2005

Inuit Legend Barbie Doll may also be purchased at Perfectory on eBay.

Please contact us if you have any questions.

*****
Christy Marcus was 20 years old and a second-year fashion student at Ryerson University in Toronto when she designed the Inuit-art inspired Barbie doll. Marcus won the Mattel Canada competition “What will Barbie wear in 2005?” The contest challenged students to create an original design based on “their unique vision” for the world’s quintessential fashion icon. Marcus’s grandmother was originally from Nunavik, although Marcus doesn’t know exactly which community she came from. “My grandmother’s name was Mary Verhaegen, but her maiden name was Mary Shem,” Marcus said. “My grandmother lived a traditionally Inuit lifestyle when she was younger, although she was half-Inuit and half-Cree. When her parents died, she continued to embrace her Inuit background. When she met my grandfather, they married and eventually moved to Windsor, Ontario, where my mother and I were born.” While growing up, Marcus said she had a very close bond with her grandmother, and even lived with her grandparents for a short period. “Although she never talked about her background or her youth, on occasion we would watch Inuit television shows and listen to Inuit music. On a very rare occasion I heard her speaking Inuttitut with old friends that still lived in Quebec,” Marcus said. This northern connection inspired Marcus’ winning entry dubbed “The Kenojuak Gown,” which features hand-painted, off-white crêpe panels trimmed in braided suede and white faux fur accessories.

Kenojuak Ashevak

Kenojuak Ashevak, Canadian Inuit Artist

Kenojuak Ashevak, (1927 – 2013) was a Canadian Inuit artist. The art world regards her as one of the most notable Canadian pioneers of modern Inuit art.

Her Inuit Legend Barbie Doll design beat out “Butterfly Barbie”, “Let’s Paint this Town Red Barbie”, and “Mysteriously Romantic Barbie” designs to win Mattel Canada’s “What will Barbie Wear in 2005?” competition. Marcus used acrylic paint to decorate the crêpe with stylized images of birds based on Ashevak’s painting The Enchanted Owl. A Canadian postage stamp featured this image in the early 1970s.

By winning the competition, Marcus joins the ranks of Georgio Armani, Moschino, Vera Wang and many other top fashion designers as a designer for Barbie Dolls. Marcus received a $1,500 cash prize and a designer profile on the Mattel website. The Barbie package bearing her design will also feature her designer profile. Ryerson University School of Fashion and Mattel Canada organized the competition in honour of Barbie Doll’s 45th Anniversary, to encourage young designers to create a Canadian Barbie doll. “After my grandmother’s death I realized how little I actually knew about her background, and that really saddened me. Since then I have always been interested in Inuit culture,” Marcus said. “Upon hearing that the Barbie selected from this competition would be exclusively available in Canada, I realized this was a great opportunity for me to research not only my [own], but Canada’s roots. I look very much forward to learning more about Inuit culture.”

The doll wearing Marcus’s design was on the store shelves in the fall of 2005, and sold out quickly. Here is your opportunity to own this beautiful and symbolic collector’s item!